17 Message Sticks: 17 Communities

Moorambilla Voices in 2017 is about unearthing the stories of our region with “17 Message Sticks: 17 Communities”.

We have postponed the first two weeks of the Skills Development Workshop Tour. We will still be teaching, singing and dancing across the entire region over three weeks. And this year we’re still excited to be part of the BOSTES teacher accreditation scheme through the NSW Department of Education. We apologise for the inconvenience.

Throughout the year, we’ll be unfolding what it means to live in our region, focussing on 17 communities, with specially commissioned music and performance, dance and choreography, stunning photography, sculpture, exhibitions, stories, narrative journeys and more!

We are creating the first Australian-made taiko ensemble ever! And we’re donating it to the region! We’ve secured funding to build from scratch a stunning large-scale ensemble of Australian-made taiko drums for the region’s youth to play in performances that speak of the rich cultural legacy and capacity of rural Australia. Watch out for them in August!

We’re immersing ourselves in Gundabooka, near Bourke, in July, to discover, uncover and bring to life the stories and landscape of that region in music, dance and visual art. This immersion is facilitated by Phillip Sullivan in partnership with NSW NPWS

We’re recording! With the next generation of graduates from ANAM and our wonderful friends at AWO we are getting into the studio to record some new Australian Christmas carols in July for you!

We’re getting together in Baradine in August and then again in September to sing, sing and sing! And we will rehearse, learn, dance and build light sculptures!

We’re performing, not two, but three concerts at Dubbo Theatre this year in September 23 and 24, 2017.

We’re celebrating the region’s amazing creativity at Studio MV, a new space for a series of exhibitions, performances and creativity in Sydney. Our first event is Clive Live on March 16-18! And then we present stunning watercolours by Tracey Loughlin, Sydney, and Annie Murray, Walgett from April 13.

We are sharing our exceptional resources with researchers and educators. As a recognised publisher of online material of national interest developed from our program, we have been asked to contribute to the Pandora Archive at the National Library of Australia – forever keeping our achievements alive. WOW!

Artwork: Burnt wood emu callers, Peter Gordon, Brewarrina, 2006.
Photography: Noni Carroll.

Leave a Reply